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  1. #1

    Default Overhead Mic Suspension

    I have a drum set that is recording nicely - so the mics that are used usually stay deployed each having its ziplock bag pulled over when not in use. It is kind of tucked in a corner and hard to navigate around the stands... Depending on who is playing it (I can assure you it should not be me) it gets reconfigured. It has occurred to me that some of the mics could be mounted overhead (while still able to reposition). Has anyone done this or know of hardware like clamps that can grab a beam that adapt to mic-stand tubing.

    A couple of years ago I watched Standing In the Shadows of Motown and I think they had mics suspended from what looked like horizontal 1-1/4 galvanized pipes about 7' up. Of course there are reasons why some things aren't done anymore - but it may have been typical (and may still be used. Not having been in many studios, what do I know?). Anyway, I want to try something in this spot and am open to tips and suggestions...

    John

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Toronto Canada
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    2,818

    Default Re: Overhead Mic Suspension

    Quote Originally Posted by jmh View Post
    I have a drum set that is recording nicely - so the mics that are used usually stay deployed each having its ziplock bag pulled over when not in use. It is kind of tucked in a corner and hard to navigate around the stands... Depending on who is playing it (I can assure you it should not be me) it gets reconfigured. It has occurred to me that some of the mics could be mounted overhead (while still able to reposition). Has anyone done this or know of hardware like clamps that can grab a beam that adapt to mic-stand tubing.

    A couple of years ago I watched Standing In the Shadows of Motown and I think they had mics suspended from what looked like horizontal 1-1/4 galvanized pipes about 7' up. Of course there are reasons why some things aren't done anymore - but it may have been typical (and may still be used. Not having been in many studios, what do I know?). Anyway, I want to try something in this spot and am open to tips and suggestions...

    John
    John,

    I think suspending mics over the kit is a great space-saving idea.

    There are some high end clamps in the lighting world. For example, check out the Manfrotto arms, clamps and adapters. They're not cheap but they're solid and work very well.

    The LP Claw may work, depending on the size of the beam.

    A desk arm could work well, depending how repeatable you'd like the setup to be.

    In theory, wood clamps could be made to work.

    There might be something in drum hardware clamps that could work.


  3. #3

    Default Re: Overhead Mic Suspension

    I have a couple of approaches I am experimenting with, and intend to build in a bit of vibration protection. I'll report the results.

    By coincidence, I saw the Levin Brothers at the Turning Point (about 25 miles north of Manhattan) tonight. It is a tiny club with a drum kit in a little alcove with low ceilings - anyway, they had a single mic on a ~24" goose-neck over the kit -which probably has been there for a long time perhaps working on my subconscious. Over the years, (among others,) I was able to see Alan Holdsworth there several times - which was a kind of torture for a guitar player (because we really are not worthy) - but at the same time very liberating as it made a complete mockery of any guitar limitations us mortals struggle with.

    John

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